‘Dance’ Category

  1. Give Yourself a Chance!

    December 28, 2017 by Joo-Lee

    Screenshot 2017-12-28 10.55.34

    We hear the same things so often from people who wish they could dance but have not yet given it a try.

    “I have Two Left Feet…. I have no rhythm…. I am the world’s worst dancer… it’s impossible to teach me to dance ……

    My response is simple. It’s about making the decision to turn up to your first class with an open mind. If you have already decided that you’d be no good then you are not giving yourself the chance to try something that you might come to like a lot. You don’t know unless you try!

    Learning to dance takes time but it won’t be long before you’re having fun if you allow yourself to relax, enjoy and see what it’s about. To enjoy the experience, my advice is to follow the instructions but don’t be tempted to do anything that is distracting or unhelpful to yourself. I see so many new beginners looking at their feet so that they can assess their progress. It’s very distracting if you are busy assessing yourself whilst trying a new skill at the same time. You will learn much more easily if you allow yourself to follow the class without checking if you’re doing the right thing. Everyone makes mistakes and you will, too, so just keep moving as it doesn’t matter.

    One thing everyone needs to realize is if you think everyone is looking at you, think again; they are probably worrying about the same thing as you and are too worried to be looking at you!

    You will never know if you can dance if you don’t give yourself the chance to try. Everyone was once a beginner and most of these beginners are now enjoying the fun of dancing to fantastic live bands and having the most amazing social life. Imagine how you’d feel by this time next year, when you, too could be dancing like it’s the most natural thing in the world.

    Anyone can enjoy social dancing. This kind of dancing will not require you to do the splits, spin on your head or even memorise a routine! You just need give yourself the chance to take your first step, and that is to try a class.

    Your first visit to Lindy Jazz is free so you can check it out for yourself. Try one class and if you feel OK about it, then maybe try a course so you can give yourself the chance to make progress.


  2. Mel and Jo at DJam 2018

    November 14, 2017 by Gillian Scott

    You never know who you are likely to meet when you go to dance workshops and events, or how these friendships and relationships will evolve over the years, and when I met Mel and Jo at a dance camp in Leeds, I was struck by how approachable and friendly they both were, and how willing they were to share their dance knowledge with others.

    Although they were only new to teaching when we first met, they were confident, capable and enthusiastic, and are now one of the most sought-after Balboa dancing couples, so their hard work has really paid off!

    A couple who are not complacent about their own learning, you will often see Mel and Jo joining classes as students along with the rest of us, and it is this hunger for education and passion for improvement that has kept them at the top of their game.

    Mel and Jo’s dancing style is clear and encouraging, with lots of personal feedback, and their big secret is to challenge students to think creatively and to question everything about their dancing.

    Of the pair, Mel is also a great DJ, and it is clear that his early background as a professional DJ allows him to really use the music to create the perfect atmosphere for the dancers. His deep understanding and relationship with the music influences what content and style of teaching goes into his classes, which is why we are pleased to say that Mel will, of course, be DJing and DJam this year! Likewise, it is great to see Jo back up in the North every year as she is a Northern lass herself!

    A lovely, extremely inclusive pair, with a great sense of humour Mel and Jo are always great fun on the social dancefloor, dancing with everyone and having a good time.

    Mel-Jo

    That’s why when the opportunity came up for us to invite them to DJam 2018 we were very excited. Want to find out more about these inspiring and sought after teachers? Check out DJam at https://www.dance-at-djam.co.uk!


  3. David and Catia at DJam 2018

    November 7, 2017 by Joo-Lee

     

    What can I say about David and Catia? They are a tireless, talented and tenacious team that will work you hard and always achieve great results for their trouble!

    When I first met both David and Catia they were classmates at Swing Summit – an intense Lindy Hop training program in Ardèche, France – and from the moment I saw them they already stood out as warm, generous people and of course, exceptionally talented dancers. The next time we met up, they were no longer students, but teachers at Swing Summit!

    Since our days in France, I’ve been to loads of workshops run by this pair, and they have even come over here to each our local dancers a thing or two. With a relaxed and musical dancing style, David and Catia are a pleasure to watch, but don’t be fooled by their laid-back appearance, these two are technique geeks who are unrelenting in their pursuit of dance perfection!

    As teachers, they will make you work hard, with a heavy emphasis on technique, however their natural ability to break down complex ideas and methods to make them seem simple and easy to master is a huge benefit to their students. These skills, coupled with ample practice time, and the individual attention that they give everyone in their classes makes learning with David and Catia not only educational, but a whole load of fun!

    Aside from his passion for dancing, David is also a great DJ who genuinely feels and understands the music, which in turn carries through to his classes. A couple of cheerful, happy instructors who always give every class their all, you won’t forget a swing class from these two in a hurry!

    That’s why when the opportunity came up for us to invite them to DJam 2018 we were very excited. Want to find out more about these inspiring and sought after teachers? Check out DJam at https://www.dance-at-djam.co.uk!


  4. Hector and Sonia at DJam 2018

    October 14, 2017 by Andy Lewis

    Have you ever wondered how event organisers choose teachers? This is why we chose Hector and Sonia for DJam.

    Hector Artal and Sonia Ortega are two of the loveliest, most talented teachers I’ve met in all the years I’ve been dancing Lindy Hop.

    I met them first some years ago at Tenhola – a small Finnish Lindy camp. I’d been invited there as a DJ, and was quickly won over by the camp’s slick organisation, and warmth and friendliness of the team and attendees.

    That year, there was only one Lindy Hop level – which can mean that workshops are very mixed in level – so we had two Spaniards, teaching advanced material in English to a predominantly Finnish group – this would have been a real challenge for many Lindy teachers. Not so for Hector and Sonia – their teaching style was perfect for the task, and by the end of my first workshop, everyone had learned the material, regardless of their level, and everyone had made huge strides in their general technique. Personally, even though I’ve never been taught the material from that workshop by anyone else, years later I am still using it in my social dancing.

    I can never tire of watching them dance, and I seek out every chance I can to learn from this wonderful couple – so when the chance to book them for DJam came up last year, we jumped at the chance – and we’re incredibly excited to welcome them back for 2018 – so if you’re looking to learn from these inspiring and sought after teachers, check out DJam at https://www.dance-at-djam.co.uk!


  5. What are the Teaching Philosophies for DJam?

    October 1, 2017 by Andy Lewis

    Mel & Jo teaching at DJam 2015

    How many times have you learned an amazing new technique or move in a workshop and said to yourself: “That’s incredible! That’s one I’m going to keep using forever….”

    As for me? Honestly? I have no idea. It’s happened a lot – but I keep forgetting them. Which is a little ironic…

    Too many times, I rush out of a workshop, and straight into the next one… before the first one has fully “taken” – and no matter how well taught – how great the material – it’s vanished from my head. In a well-intended attempt to provide as much for its students as possible, a camp has quite simply made it much harder for me to retain what I’ve learned.

    In other words – after decades of going to dance camp after dance camp, experiencing workshop upon inspirational workshop, from teacher after wonderful teacher…. from which I’ve remembered far too little… I’ve come to realise some key things about workshops:

    1. An hour for a workshop is not enough.
    2. Practice it right away, or lose it.
    3. Recap videos are useless once you’ve forgotten the workshop
    4. Small class sizes are great

     

    For DJam 2018, we’ve decided to put a big focus on providing a truly transformational learning experience – so we’ve made some key changes to the core workshop format.

    1. Each core workshop will last an hour and a half, so you really will have time to learn, absorb and practice the techniques and ideas that are being taught.
    2. Each core workshop will be followed with half an hour of practice / consolidation time, so that you can make the most of what you’ve learned. Practice with your partner, or with others in the workshop. Work with your fellow students – they may have had insights that will help you – and you may well have insights that will help them.
    3. The class sizes will be smaller and more intimate. This lets the teachers give a lot more personal attention to the individual students, giving them the help that they need to make the most of the material.

     

    In this way, and by choosing some truly wonderful teachers that we love learning from, we hope to make DJam 2018 the best learning experience it can possibly be. I’m so excited for this event – and I truly hope it helps make DJam the perfect event for people that truly want to focus on transforming their Lindy Hop or Balboa, and reaching the next level in their dancing.

    AJL


  6. When Can I Join The Intermediate Class?

    February 6, 2017 by Joo-Lee

    So you’ve been attending beginner classes on and off for a while and you’re wondering when you can join the Intermediate Class? Here is everything you need to know!

    I’m often asked by dancers if they can join the Intermediate Class as the class time suits them better or they have previous dance experience in another style and therefore consider themselves to be able to pick up new steps quickly or they feel it’s been some time since they’ve started beginner classes, and although these are all valid reasons, there are certain skills and qualities that I look for before inviting dancers to join the Intermediate Class.

    It is worth noting that progress is not always related to the number of weeks or months that you have been dancing in the class. Progress usually relies on both attendance and engagement, so if you turn up to class regularly and engage as fully as possible, then your dancing will improve quickly, whilst if you attend class sporadically, you have to leave early and you rarely dance with other students, then your progress will be slower. It is important to really focus on building your basic Lindy Hop toolkit, so that you don’t struggle or hold others back in the Intermediate Class.

    What do I need to know about joining the Intermediate Class?

    When joining the Intermediate Class, you will be joining a group of experienced dancers who have been working on their dancing for a while. They are also keen to keep improving all the time, and although you can expect everyone to be very welcoming and encouraging, please bear in mind that when you rotate partners all of you will affect each other.

    If you’re interested in joining the Intermediate Class, then practice, attendance and enthusiasm are key. My advice would be to stay back after class to practise with other dancers and to ask for feedback from your teachers as regularly as possible to build your foundation before moving to the Intermediate Class.

    The focus of learning to dance at Lindy Jazz is personal development; to build our skills, confidence and to gain more joyful dance experiences. Our focus is not social status so you will find that we are not concerned about which ‘level’ we might be. Within the Intermediate Class, you will find that some dancers are more advanced, more skilled and more experienced than others and everyone has different aims and learn at a different pace.

    What skills or qualities do you look for when inviting someone new to join the Intermediate Class?

    Every scene or community runs classes in their own way, and at Lindy Jazz, we have some expectations of what we’d like to see before you join the Intermediate Class. These skills are taught at our weekly classes and weekend workshops, and we encourage you to attend these classes before jumping into the Intermediate Class.

    1. a clear and consistent pulse (or ‘bounce’)
    2.  relaxed arms & shoulders that ‘stretch & release’ without over-extending
    3. a ‘free foot’ when shifting weight
    4. triple step footwork with ease
    5. Charleston footwork with ease
    6. an open attitude to feedback
    7. a positive response to mistakes e.g. joy instead of stress
    8. regular attendance at intermediate and beginner classes – every week if you can
    9. regular attendance at weekend workshops – at least once a month if you can
    10. regular practice – staying back to practise social dancing every week and practising your drills for 5 minutes every day if you can

    When I see dancers meet most of the above expectations, I will invite them to join the Intermediate Class. Sometimes, I may invite them to join the warm up drills at the beginning of the class and then to observe the rest of the class, sometimes, I might ask a lead-follow couple to stay with each other instead of ‘rotating’ for a couple of weeks until their basics are secure.

    Every class is different

    Please remember that there are no set rules in the ‘world of Lindy Hop’ and that every class is run independently so the expectations as explained in this blog post are created as a guide for classes at Lindy Jazz. Having said that all Lindy Hop communities are united along similar key philosophies which are joy, fun and friendship through social dancing, so keep dancing!

    Lindy Jazz classes are on Tuesdays at Gosforth Parish Hall NE3 1YT

    19:30 Intermediate Class

    20:30 Beginners’ Class

    21:15 Social Dancing & Practice

     


  7. A Newbies’ Guide To DJam….. and what is Lindy A?

    December 23, 2016 by Joo-Lee

    If you’re new to the world of swing dancing, you may have heard other dancers talk excitedly about DJam, an international swing dance camp. But what exactly is a dance camp? Are there tents and campfires, and most importantly, do the dancers actually go camping? If you love camping then I am afraid you won’t find log cabins and singsongs (well, not at most dance camps anyway); a dance camp is usually just a weekend of learning through structured classes, with social dancing in the evening to enjoy your new-found skills.

    Now that we’ve got that cleared up, it’s time to talk about DJam! A blissful weekend of dancing, learning, meeting new people and having fun, DJam is a swing dance camp held in the stunning Beamish Hall Hotel in County Durham each year.

    Most dance camps are attended by experienced dancers. That’s because experienced dancers know that to improve their dancing a lot, they need to start learning from world-class teachers and dance with a wider range of dancers. They know that if they only ever dance with a small group of people and never venture outside of their local class, their dancing progress will plateau. As organisers of DJam, we also teach a local weekly class which attracts a regular influx of beginners so we know the worries that new dancers have when thinking about improving their dancing and how they don’t feel confident enough to come to DJam or come on their own. So I’ve summarised some information here to help all new dancers to get a flavour of DJam. At the time of writing, we have just 10 places left in the Lindy Hop beginner level ‘track’. So…..what is Lindy A? What is a track? What happens at DJam? If you’re a new beginner, read on……

    At DJam, there will be several tracks meaning different classes in different styles. Once you’ve decided on your track eg Lindy Hop, the next thing to do is to choose your level and Lindy A would be the beginners level where no previous dance experience would be required. Your teachers will know that everyone in your group will be new and possibly nervous! DJam teachers are hand picked not just for their dancing and teaching skills but also for their warmth, friendliness and care for new dancers.

    The teachers and the DJam Team are very approachable and will be happy to answer any questions about dancing; even if the questions may seem basic, for example, what to wear to the evening socials, how to ask for dances, what time the cabaret or competitions are on, what’s for lunch, anything!

    When you arrive at Beamish Hall at the start of the DJam weekend, you’ll be made to feel welcomed by the organisers & volunteers. You will be given lots of information and introduced to other beginner dancers, who won’t know others either so they’ll be just as nervous.

    The DJam schedule is packed with daytime classes, evening parties & various social activities. You can choose to do as little or as much as you want. In addition to your own track, meaning your set of Lindy Hop beginner classes that you have booked for in advance, you can also drop into taster classes. Taster classes are designed to give a little taste of other styles of dance and a whole host of interesting topics, for example. Blues, Balboa, Shag, Aerials, Swing Music. You don’t need to book for taster classes in advance. Once you’ve arrived at DJam, just take a look at your schedule and see what looks the most interesting to you.

    Your Lindy A classes will consist of a small group of dancers who will learn ‘from scratch’ – how to dance, what to do at social dances, how to understand the etiquette of social dancing, how to move well, how to dance to swing music, how to lead, follow and dance with people you don’t know etc. In short, your dance skills and knowledge of dancing and swing music will be transformed and you will feel a lot more confident when you next go dancing.

    You can choose your ideal ticket from a number of options and we call this a ‘pass‘,  so you can come for just Saturday or just two days or make the most of it and come for the whole weekend or even stay over at Beamish Hall Hotel. The DJam team, the volunteers and I will make sure that you feel included, enabling you to make the most of this opportunity.

    As the deadline for booking is fast approaching and there are only 10 places left, book now or contact me, Joo-Lee, for more information.

    More info: www.dance-at-djam.co.uk

    Deadline for booking: 30 December 2016

    See you at DJam!


  8. Do I Need To Learn Routines?

    December 9, 2016 by Joo-Lee

    Screenshot 2016-08-24 13.22.45

    New beginners often ask us to teach them a routine or a sequence when in fact, it’s easier to dance if you learn the skills to dance rather than try to memorise a lot of moves. So often we see new dancers  busy learning a whole bunch of moves. My question is, “Do you remember everything? Do your moves work when you social dance with dancers who haven’t done that exact class and those exact moves?” Perhaps what you’ve just learnt doesn’t work because you haven’t had the chance to consolidate anything and your body hasn’t had the chance to learn how to move. Then at social dances, you end up forgetting your moves.

    When learning a social dance such as the Lindy Hop, it can be easy to get stuck in a rut by just dancing patterns and routines, rather than learning to move naturally and confidently so that you don’t need to think and concentrate hard when you dance. If you develop the skills to move well and train your body to do what you want it to do, then you will be able to carry out new and exciting moves. I truly believe that we all need to learn how to move easily before being concerned about how many moves we can pull off on the dance floor.

    Using the building blocks and drills taught in class will give you structure, certainty and security when you dance. These are short phrases that you can practise over and over again until you develop the muscle memory for the basics, such as the pulse and rhythm. However, if you are new to this and have got used to set moves and routines, you may find it to be very unfamiliar but if you are able to spend 5 minutes a day practising these simple techniques, you will soon find dancing easier and more enjoyable.

    Then you might be asking yourself, “Will I have enough moves to get through a whole song without being boring to my partner?”. Well, the constant repetition of techniques like triple steps and Charleston kicks in class is not meant as a pattern for every dance, but rather they should be practised as useful drills that can help you to develop muscle memory, so that, with practice, you will be able to simply enjoy dancing without thinking consciously about the actual steps. When you start to intuitively dance like this and let your mind relax, then you will find it easier to move to the music in a fluid manner, which in turn will give your partner a really good dance too. In other words, knowing a few rules without being rigid with the rules can give you a lot of freedom!

    There’s no right or wrong way to dance, so if you prefer to dance a set of routines that you know, then that’s absolutely fine. As you gain more experience, you will find yourself naturally being able to take on these amazing and exciting skills.

    So if you’re keen to take your dancing to the next level, and wondering what skills you need to learn so that you get a strong grasp of the techniques to social dance with confidence,  then why not join us on Sunday 8th January for one of two excellent workshops, and give it a go?

     

     


  9. Lead or Follow: Who’s in Charge?

    November 23, 2016 by Joo-Lee

    Dance Partners

    Whether you’re a confident dancer, a newbie, or a dabbler, when it comes to dancing, sometimes there’s a bone of contention in partnerships when it comes to who is in charge. A recent interview I did with the BBC  got me thinking about the dynamics of dancing, and just exactly who should be taking the lead.

    When you go to a Lindy Hop class for the first time, it can often be quite a shock to learn that you don’t simply learn a dance routine off by heart and go on your way. Instead of being concerned with who’s in charge, and who should be doing what, it’s more of a conversation between you and your dance partner, rather than a rehearsed script that you learn off by heart. It’s important to feel what your partner is doing, and respond to it by using the moves and techniques you have been taught. Dancing, especially when it comes to swing dance, is all about spontaneity and communication and creating a connection with your partner that you can share. That’s why, when we hold classes we ‘rotate’ or ‘switch’ the partners so you’re not just dancing with the person you came with. This way you’re far less likely to have a dance domestic!

    We often find that if you’re dancing with a stranger (of course, they won’t necessarily be a stranger for long), you’re probably not going to be concerned with telling them what to do and how to do it, so your concentration and ability to communicate clearly improves. Dancing with a different partner also allows people of all different abilities and experiences to dance together, which can really help to develop your understanding and feel of the dance. Plus, it’s a lot of fun, and it’s definitely a great way to make new friends!

    Whether you’re on your own, part of a group, or in a couple, there’s room for everyone at our swing dance classes, and no one will be left out; Lindy Jazz offers you your first class for free, so there’s no excuse not to throw on your dancing shoes and give it a go.


  10. Social Dance Or Show Dance?

    September 30, 2016 by Joo-Lee

    strictly-come-dancing-judges

    What would you do if you had the chance to compete in Strictly Come Dancing? Would you go for it or would you find it a nerve-racking experience? Imagine learning a brand new skill, wearing a glitterry costume and performing in public, then being judged by professional experts and watched by millions of people at home.

    This got me thinking about why people dance, and how styles of dancing differ depending on whether you’re dancing socially, or for a competition. If you’re an entertainer, then you’ll enjoy impressing people with your skills, and for most beginners, it is this pressure to amaze that puts them off, but they needn’t worry. Dancing is a also a social skill, and when you’re not dancing for a competition or a show, it can be the most aamzing experience.

    When you dance for social reasons it’s  like learning a language. You’ll learn the words and  the grammar, and then you put it all together into sentences. You don’t learn a language just so you can stand up on a stage and recite a poem, you learn a language so you can converse with others, and with social dancing it’s exactly the same.

    After learning the steps and the techniques, you can then build your dance using what you’ve learnt. Much like going abroad and being forced to converse in a new language, dancing socially with different dancers is the best way to hone and refine your skills, and after the first few times you will have improved immeasurably.

    Unlike professional show dancers who learn a set choreography, social dancing is taught using moves that can be combined to form a sort of conversation, rather than a pre-rehearsed, pre-determined script. With social swing dancing, it’s like having a real conversation; dancers come together with a live band or a DJ and ask each other to dance; neither knows what the other is going to say, how they’re going to react or what they’re going to do, resulting in a truly unique conversation that can’t be replicated. So if you have ever thought about joining a class or taking up a new skill, why not have a look at our Swing Dance Beginner course to help build your confidence before you dive right in?